25 Beautiful and Colorful Freshwater Fish to Keep in Your Aquarium

Keeping an aquarium in your house brings in positive energy and good vibes and has a few things to relate to with Feng shui facts. Apart from this, the colorful fishes inhabiting the tank are no less than eye candy for your eyes and can calm down your nerves when you are back after a hectic day.

Seeing those fishes swirling and twirling in the fish tanks can make one’s day and give them an eye-pleasing sight to cherish. So, if you are someone who has been looking out for some colorful fishes to expand the population in your water tank, here is a quick guide for welcoming them in your tanks. Read further to get acquainted with a few fishy details of the top 25 beautiful and colorful freshwater fishes that can bring your aquariums in some new life.

 

25 Beautiful and Colorful Freshwater Fish to Keep in Your Aquarium

Cory Catfish:

Cory Catfish

Cory Catfishes belong to the Callichthyidae family and have their scientific name as Corydoras. These fishes have originated in South America and are commonly known as Armored Catfish, Corydoras, Cory Catfish, and Cory Cats.

Feature:

Cory catfishes or Armored fishes derive this name owing to their bones, which are plate-shaped and runs down through their entire body length. They exist in various colors and sizes and are considered as popular aquarium fishes. A corydoras catfish is known as tank cleaners. Their length varies between 1 inch to 2.5 inches, and their heads are thicker. They explicit a triangular look with tapered tails. 

Caring:

Cory catfishes cannot live in tanks that do not have adequate water conditions as they can be prone to diseases in such a case. The pH of the aquarium should be between 7.0 to 7.8, and the temperature should be set at 72-78°F. As a beginner, you can keep cory catfishes in aquariums filled with 10 gallons of water.

Food habit:

Since Cory catfishes are omnivores, they can be fed with pallets, fish flakes, and bottom feeder tablets. Moving inside the aquarium, these fishes have the capability of digging the gravel surface and can continue to dig with their mouths. They also scavenge though they cannot be left solely to feed on leftover food.

Aquarium mates:

Cory catfishes can dwell with other fishes that are friendly and non-aggressive. A few fishes that can gel well along with cory catfishes are swordtails, tetras, shrimps, otocinclus, catfishes, etc. A few breeds of freshwater snails can also be kept along with them in the aquarium.

 

Dwarf Gourami:

dwarf gourami

These fishes have originated in India and are mostly found in the states of West Bengal and Assam. They belong to the Belonidae family and are commonly known as flame gourami, powder blue gourami, sunset gourami, and red gourami. Its scientific name is Trichogaster Lalius.

Features: 

They are peaceful fishes and have a lifespan of about four years. While talking about their bodies, the male fishes have a bright colored mix of orange and red along with stripes of turquoise blue color that is extended towards their fins. Females are not bright colored as males and are usually found in slightly dull colors such as silver blue-grey color.

Caring

These fishes can be kept in smaller tanks with 5 gallons of water, maintaining a pH between 6.0 to 7.5. The water hardness should be between 4-10dGH, and the temperature should be set between 72°-82°F.

Food habit:

They are omnivores and can eat algae and small insects available in the water. They also feed on frozen foods, vegetable tablets, freeze-dried food, etc. To keep them in good health, you can also consider giving them diet supplements along with ‘live food’ such as worms.

Aquarium mates:

These fishes can easily be kept with other fish species that are non-aggressive and small in size. It is said that other fish breeds that are bright-colored should not be kept with gourami because they can make the male Gouramis to explicit aggressive behavior. A few tank mates for gourami’s are neon tetra, dwarf cichlids, cardinal tetra, etc.

 

German Blue Ram:

 

If you wish your fish aquariums to create a colorful twinkle, then adding German Blue Rams to it can be your best bet. They are colorful cichlids and have the might of melting your heart by seeing their captivating and bright colors. Its scientific name is Mikrogeophagus Ramirez and is also commonly known as Butterfly Cichlid Electric Blue Ram.

Features: 

They usually come in yellow, white, and blue colors and have a lifespan range between 2-4 years. Their size ranges between 2-3 inches and often have green-colored bodies and heads with additional blue and white colors in their body.

You can also spot black colored curved lines running down the entire length of their body with a few black dots in the middle. They have red-colored eyes and red or yellow colored fins with blue linings. The dorsal portion is black, whereas in the females, the belly color is usually orangish pink, and they are smaller in size in comparison to their male counterparts.

 

Caring:

You can consider keeping a pair of German Blue Rams in a tank that contains 10 gallons of water or more. You can consider including freshwater with a few plants for these fishes to have a dwelling place. The temperature of the water should be maintained between 82°-86°F, and the pH scale should be between 6 to 7. Also, ensure that the hardness of water is between 2 to 5 dGH.

 

Food habit:

These fishes are omnivores in their feeding habits and can eat plants and meat both. They can feed on small insects and invertebrates as well. Live mosquito larvae and floating plant material are a few other things that they would love to be fed with.

Aquarium mates:

Though cichlids are thought to be as aggressive, these fishes showcase exactly opposite behavior and are peaceful. You can consider keeping them with other cichlids, Silver dollars, Discus, Dwarf Gourami’s, cardinals, Neon Tetras, etc.

 

Electric Yellow Lab:

Electric Yellow Lab fish

Electric yellow labs have been reported to originate in the deep waters of Lake Malawi. Its scientific name is Labidochromis Caeruleum and is popularly known by the names of Electric Yellow Cichlid or Yellow Labs.

Features:

They are a bit aggressive by nature but are very active at the same time. They can live up to 10 to 15 years, and their size varies between 10 to 15 inches. These fishes have a long body and are bright yellow with black colored stripes over their dorsal fins.

Caring:

These fishes can be kept in a tank with a minimum of 55 gallons of water. The temperature of the water tank should be set between 71°-80°F with a pH scale ranging between 7 to 8.5. The hardness of the water should be approximately 18 to 25 dGH.

Food habit:

They are carnivores and can eat small invertebrates. Being an omnivore, they can also feed on protein-added herbivore diet. But make sure that you do not feed them with a higher level of protein diet. Otherwise, they may bloat. These fishes can be fed with Krills, flake food, pellet food, brine shrimp, vegetables such as cucumbers and peas, etc.

Aquarium mates:

These fishes can be kept along with other semi-aggressive Cichlids such as African Cichlids. At no cost should they be kept with non-African Cichlids. Other fishes such as Mbunas, Featherfins, Peacock Cichlids, Lamprologus species can gel well along with Electric Yellow Labs. Also, make sure that you keep a single male fish along with female fish. No two male yellow labs can survive together because the males will fight with each other until one of them dies.

 

Harlequin Rasboras:

 

Harlequin Rasboras are found in the waters of Malaysian, Thailand, and Singapore countries. They belong to the Cyprinidae family and have their scientific name as Trigonostigma heteromorpha. They are also commonly known as fork chops.

Features: 

These fishes have a body shape similar to the arrowhead and usually have red and orange colors all over their body. Also, they have black-colored patches towards their sides and are active schooling fishes with a small size of 2 inches; they hardly grow beyond this. They have a narrow mouth and forked orange-colored fins. They can live for about 5-years and have striking designs on their body that will make you fall in love with them.

Caring:

These fishes are very peaceful and can live in a minimum tank size containing 10 gallons of water. The pH scale should be between 6 to 7, with the hardness of water lying in the range of 5 to 10dGH. The temperature of the water tank should be between 72°-77°F to give these fishes a comfy life in your aquariums.

Food habit:

They are omnivorous fishes, and you can consider giving them herbivore fish diets such as algae wafers and spirulina. You can also feed them with fish flakes, frozen foods, and other live foods, namely daphnia, brine shrimp, and mosquito larvae.

Aquarium mates:

Rasboras are peaceful fish breeds and do not nudge others who come on their way. Thus, you have the choice of picking similar fishes as tank mates for Rasboras. Dwarf Gourami, Platies, Cherry barbs, Danios, Corydoras Catfish, Zebra loaches, Hatchet fish, Mollies, and Tetras can serve as super tank mates for these fishes.

 

Black Molly:

Black Molly fishes are one of the most common aquarium fishes that you would love to see swirling inside the aquarium. They are most usually known as common molly or short-finned molly. These fishes can be found in abundance in the marine waters of Mexico. The scientific name of the black molly fish is Poecilia sphenops.

Features:

Male black molly fish attains a maximum size of up to 3 inches, while the size of female fish can be an inch more than that of males. Talking about skin color, they are born with melanism, which tends to turn their skin darker over time. They have short fins. Black Molly fish have a lifespan of up to 5 years.

Caring:

Twenty gallons of water is the minimum required to fill the tank for keeping black molly fish. When talking about adequate temperature, the water should have a temperature somewhere between 70°-80°F, whereas the pH level should be between 7.2-8.2. They can live in hard water, having a range between 15-30 dGH.

Food:

They are omnivorous and can be fed green algae, invertebrates, or plant matter. They love to eat bloodworms, tubifex, and brine shrimp.

Aquarium tank mates:

Being peaceful, they maintain a friendly nature with their tank mates and are capable of living with various fishes. Keeping them with other black molly fishes can make them aggressive. They can be kept with guppies, platys, danios, and tetras.

 

Bristlenose Catfish:

The scientific name of Bristlenose Catfish as Ancistrus. This fish is most commonly known as the bushy nose; the name is derived from its physical appearance. They are found in South America and Panama.

Features:

These fish grow up to a size of 5 inches and have a lifespan of around five years or more. Talking about the appearance of these fishes, they are usually brown, black, grey, or olive. Their body features patches of white or yellow colors. They have a pair of abdominal and pectoral fins.

Caring:

You have to note that the temperature of the place where you will be keeping the fish should be between 60°-80°F, with a pH level of 6.5-7.5. While keeping the Bristlenose catfish, you have to make sure that the tank you are keeping it in has a size of 25 gallons or more. You have to take care of the water hardness as well, and it should be between 20-25.

Food:

Bristlenose catfish are herbivores. You can feed Bristlenose catfish with plants and vegetables. Their primary source of food is algae and larva growing all over the surface of the aquarium. You can offer them parboiled leafy veggies, carrots, cucumber, peas, driftwood, and a minimal amount of meaty foods.

Aquarium Mates:

Being a friendly and peaceful community of fishes, you can keep them with any fish, and they will maintain a calm environment with them. Guppies, platys, and tetras are good companions to Bristlenose catfish.

 

Kuhli Loach:

Kuhli Loach is one of the most beautiful fishes to keep in an aquarium, with the shape of an eel. They are known to have originated from Indonesia and Malaya Peninsula. The scientific name of the fish is Pangio kuhli. They are most commonly known as leopard loach or cinnamon loach.

Features:

Kuhli loach is believed to have a lifespan of 10 years, growing up to a size of 4 inches. They don’t have any scales on their head, whereas their body has very faint scales. These fishes have pinkish-yellow colored vertical bars on their body. Their body color is black or either brown, except for the vertical bars.

Caring:

Kuhli loach should be kept in soft water, having a hardness of 5 dGH with a pH level ranging between 5.5 to 6.5. The water should have a temperature between 73°-86°F. Make sure that the tank you are keeping the fish in has a good quality filter system. The aquarium should be capable of holding 20 gallons of water.

Food Habit:

These eel-shaped fish like to feed on an omnivorous diet. You should give them larvae or plant material to eat. You can feed them with pellets, flakes, bloodworms, tubifex, artemia, cucumber, fruits, Shelled peas, etc.

Tank Mates:

While keeping them in the tank, make sure that other mates are not aggressive. Never keep them with Tiger barbs, Cichlids, and Chinese algae eaters. It is best to keep them with Rasboras, Corydoras, Oto catfishes, tetras, Danios, etc. in your aquarium.

 

African Cichlid:

African Cichlid is known to have originated in African lakes. The scientific name of this fish is Cichlidae. Those who are looking to add color to their aquarium should look no further than African cichlid.

Features:

The colors of the African Cichlid fishes can vary between the different genders of African Cichlid. Males are brighter in color, whereas the Female African Cichlids have a dull pattern and do not exhibit bright colors. Once fully matured, these fishes attain a size of 4-6 inches. The maximum lifespan of these fishes is 15 years.

Caring:

There have to be certain precautions you need to take care of while keeping African Cichlid in the tank. Make sure that the water you keep for the Cichlids is fresh and has rocks and caves setup. The size of the aquarium should be around 30 gallons. The temperature of the water should be 75°-85°F, and the pH value should be about 7.8-8.6. African Cichlid is in the habit of living in African Cichlid inhibits the African lakes where the water is hard by nature; you keep them in has hard water that ranges between 160-320 ppm.

Food Habit:

They are omnivorous and can feed on plants, insects, or meat. You can also consider feeding them with frozen fish feeds.

Tank Mates:

Being territorial fishes, they do not like to share their region with any other fish. They are considered to be aggressive by nature, so when keeping them with any other fishes, you have to make sure that they don’t cross each other’s region. Fishes like bottom-dwelling fish and Africa catfish can serve as good companions to African Cichlid.

 

Redhead Cichlid:

Redhead Cichlid Fish

The Redhead Cichlid, also recognized as the Quetzal Cichlid, is a wide Mexican species maturing to beautiful multi-colouring pastel fishes that you would love to cherish in your aquariums. One will usually find them in the waterways of Mexico, Belize, and Guatemala. Vieja melanura is the scientific name of Redhead Cichlid. This species is generally known as Quetzal Cichlid and Firehead Cichlid.

Features:

It is one of the most colourful species of cichlids with males on their flanks showing metallic green, blue, pink, and orange. The key to identifying them is the presence of a single dark horizontal stripe that runs down from the base of the caudal fin to the mid-body. For Redhead cichlid, life expectancy is ten years.

Care:

This specie requires at least 55 Gallons of pristine water to live peacefully inside the freshwater. The pH level must be maintained around 7-8.5, and the temperature must be adjusted in between 77°-82°F. The hardness of water can vary between 10 to 15 dGH.

Food Habit:

They are herbivorous, high protein foods that pose a high risk of bloat. You can feed the read heads with cichlid pellets of high quality, along with meaty foods such as prawns, musk, and whitefish. They are not fussy eaters and are not very demanding. Cichlid pellets, along with some spirulina flake, should be used for the staple diet.

Aquarium Tankmates:

A bonded couple will often live together very happily, but care should be taken to ensure that her partner does not annoy the female. Some tank mates to attempt include convicts, green terrors, Jack Dempseys, and cichlids from Texas.

 

Betta Fish:

Betta Fish

Betta splendens is the scientific name of this fish. This species of fish is most commonly known as the Siamese fighting fish. You can find them in Thailand, Cambodia, and Vietnam.

Features:

Betta fish have various colours and patterns. Their gigantic fins look elegant. They have a lifespan of around four years, within which they grow up to a size of 2-2.5 inches.

Caring:

You will have to take care of certain things while keeping them in a tank as they have a few specifications to meet. The container in which you are keeping betta fish should be of the size of 10 gallons. The temperature of the water of the tank should be maintained somewhere between 75°-80°F. The pH level of the water should be 6-8, whereas the hardness of the water should be around 5-35 dGH.

Food:

Betta fish are carnivores, and thus, they should be fed with small animals such as bloodworms, mosquitoes, brine shrimp, and worms. Their diet mostly consists of protein.

Tank Mates:

It’s tough to decide on what can be a good companion for betta fish because of their not so friendly nature. Being an aggressive fish community, they do not like to be friends with any other fish. They can be perfect companions with shoaling fish, Cory catfish, ghost shrimp, and guppies.

 

Boesemani Rainbow:

Boesemani Rainbow fish

Boesemani rainbows belong to the Melanotaeniidae family and have their scientific name as Melanotaenia boesemani. They are commonly known as Boeseman’s rainbowfish and Boesemani rainbowfish. They were originally found in the western part of New Guinea island in the Indonesian country and had a peaceful temperament.

Features: 

Boesemani Rainbow can grow to an adult fish between the size range of 8 to 11 inches. They can live up to 8 years and have an elliptical-shaped body. Also, these fishes have flattened bodies and are tall in their building, and have anal fins along their dorsal part. They have forked tail fins and have large eyes and narrow heads.

They have a blue-colored head and middle body. While moving towards the tail from the central body part, the color changes into yellowish-orange. The male counterparts are more brightly coloured in comparison to the female Boesemani Rainbow.

Caring:

These fishes can survive in water tanks that can cater to about 120 liters of water or 26.4 gallons. The pH scale should be ideally between 6.5 and 7.5, with the hardness of water lying in the range of 10 to 20 dGH. The water tank temperature should be maintained anywhere between 81°-86°F.

Food habit:

These fishes are not highly demanding and can survive with basic fish food. You can consider feeding them with artificial, frozen, or live fish food. These fishes are omnivores; hence you can feed them with vegetable diet and insects as well. It is said that the color of these fishes depends on the feed they get. Thus, it is recommended that you should use high-quality food for feeding the Boesemani Rainbows.

Aquarium mates:

These fishes can serve to be great companions with other fishes of the same temperament and behavior. They can get well with peaceful community fishes, including Rasboras, peaceful barbs, Catfish, Danios, etc.

 

Paradise Fish:

Paradise fishes belong to the Osphronemidae family and are also known as paradise gourami and blue paradise fish. Its scientific name is Macropodus opercularis and is mostly found in Southeast Asian countries like India and Pakistan. It is also found in China and Hong Kong.

Features:

Paradise fishes have vivid color stripes and the colors how variation depending on the light falling on them from different angles. These fishes exhibit a semi-aggressive behavior and can grow up to 4 inches in size. They have an approximate lifespan of six to eight years and are highly active fishes with an aggressive nature.

Caring:

These fishes can be kept in a tank size of 20 gallons with a temperature range fixed between 70°-82°F. The pH scale of water should ideally be between 6 and 8, and the hardness of the water should be between 5 to 30dGH.

Food habit:

These fishes are omnivores and can eat different kinds of fish food. They can feed on both plants and animals, which can cater to their protein requisites.

Aquarium mates:

These fishes cannot make friends with all types of fishes, especially if the tank mates are small or equal in size as of paradise fishes. They tend to hold a dominating nature, and thus you need to take care that you do not add other aggressive fish breeds to the tank. You can consider putting peaceful and bigger fishes such as goldfish, dwarf gourami’s, Bala sharks, geophagous cichlids, etc.

 

Guppy:

Guppy Fish

They are fishes that have their origin in South America and have their scientific name as Poecilia reticulate. They are very popular aquarium fishes and are also known by the names of Girardinus guppie, Millions Fish, and Rainbow fish. They derive their names as rainbow fish because of the wide range of color variants that exist in them.

Features: 

Guppies are cute little peaceful fishes belonging to the Poeciliidae family. They have a lifespan of about two years, and their size range lies between 0.6 and 2.4 inches. Guppy fishes are available in various sizes and have different tail shapes. They exist in multiple color splashes and have colorful spots and stripes on their backs.

Caring:

There are a few essential things that you need to take into account while introducing guppies to your tanks. The temperature should be adjusted between 75°-82°F. The pH value of water should be at intervals of 5.5 and 8.5. The smallest tank size for keeping a handful of guppies is 5 gallons, and for them to reproduce on a big scale, you should keep them in tanks that have a tank size of about 10 to 20 gallons.

Food habit:

Guppies are omnivores and thus love to feed on plants as well as animal matter. They are not very demanding and nor are they fussy eaters; therefore, you can expect them to eat whatever they are given. They can be fed with mosquito larvae, fish flakes, and high-protein fish foods. One can also consider giving frozen food to guppies as they love to enjoy a bloodworm or shrimp meal.

Aquarium mates:

Neon Tetras, cory catfish, mollies, gourami’s, platies can be the best tank mates for guppies. Never add any aggressive fish along with guppies as they may eat guppies and nip at their fins.

 

Flowerhorn Cichlid:

Flower horn Cichlid

The flower horn cichlids are said to be human-made hybrids; they originally marked its existence in the countries Malaysia, Taiwan, Thailand, further followed by America and Europe. They are commonly known as flower horn cichlids or flower horns. They are yet to derive their scientific name.

Features: 

The most distinctive feature of these fishes is a hump that exists on top of their heads. Flowerhorn Cichlids have lumpy chins and have similar dorsal and anal fins. They have slightly protruded eyes that stick out of their heads and have an expressive faces with prominent lips. These fishes have an average lifetime of 11 to 12 years; thus, you can expect these fishes to stay a little longer in your aquariums. Their size varies anywhere between 12 to 16 inches and has a unique look to bestow in your tank.

Caring:

To bestow adequate care for these cute little flower horns, one has to take care that the temperature of the tank ranges between 82°-85°F with a pH level of 6 to 8.5. The tank size should be enough to cater to at least 75 gallons of water, and the hardness of the water should regulate between 6 and 20 dGH.

Food habit:

When talking about their food habits, these flower horns are a bit selective with their diet. They like to have a varied diet rich in proteins, which includes dry and frozen foods. They can also eat dried grasshoppers, crickets, mealworms, black worms, nightcrawlers, etc. They should be fed with fish food at least thrice a day, depending on their breed variety.

Aquarium mates:

Flower horns are aggressive; thus, you need to take care that you allow suitable tank mates inside. The tank mates that can accompany flower horns are tiger Oscar, sailfin pleco, large bichirs, Arowana species, etc.

 

Florida Flag Fish:

The Florida Flagfish, often known as the American flagfish, is a pupfish of the Cyprinodontidae family that is the natives to Florida. Their scientific name is Jordanella Floridae. They are usually found in Florida. Its common name American flagfish comes from the body pattern of aggressive males, which reflects certain similarities to “stars and stripes.”

Features:

Flagfish are small, sturdy, 6 centimeters long, with a truncated snout compared to a bulldog. They have rounded fins with the posterior position of the dorsal and anal fins and adjacent to the caudal fin. Many American flagfish live approximately two to three years. While being a voracious eater of algae, it also has a striking color pattern that features vivid red stripes and a luminescent green that spreads across the rest of the body.

Care:

American flagfish require hard water and undemanding fish, and a couple of them can live in a 20-gallon (75 liters) aquarium quite efficiently. The pH must be maintained at about 6.5-8.5, and the temperature must be balanced in the range between 66°-86° F. The hardness range of water should adequately revolve between 12 to 25dGH.

Food Habit:

American flagfish are omnivorous and feed in the wild on crustaceans, algae, insects, and plant matter. That diet should be recreated in the home aquarium as carefully as possible. It can be accomplished by feeding them with high-quality flake food and daily vegetable feedings.

Aquarium Tankmates:

American flagfish might get excited and display signs of slow fishing aggression. For instance, Betta is a bad option for a partner. It could have its fins removed. Danios, Tetras, Swordtails, you should try this. As long as you have a fish school, there should be no problems at all.

 

Jack Dempsey Cichlid:

Jack Dempsey Cichlid

Jack Dempsey belongs to the waters of Northern and Central America and belongs to the Cichlidae family. They are scientifically known as Rocio octofasciata and are also known by the name of Mexican Blue Frontosa. They are one of the most stunning fish species that you can have in your water tank.

Features: 

Jack Dempsey Cichlid is available in a wide variety of colors with the best ones, being pink, gold, and blue. They can achieve the size of 10 to 15 inches and live for around 10-15 years if taken care of properly. They have long fins and an oval body and have excellent facial features.

Caring:

These fishes have a habit of dwelling in their own big territory and thus require about 55 gallons of water for a single Dempsey. The temperature of the tank should be calibrated somewhere between 78°-86°F maintaining the hardness level at 5 to 12 dGH. The ideal pH level should be between 6.5 and 8 for keeping these fish on the tank.

Food habit:

Jack Dempseys are carnivores, and they love to get a diet that is meaty and can easily get into their mouth. They love to have worms, insects, crustaceans, small fishes, and insects.

Aquarium mates:

Talking about their tank friends, they also need to be of similar temperament and size. These fishes are restrictive to welcome tank mates, and thus bichirs, Clown loaches, convict cichlids. Fire mouth cichlids, blue acara, silver dollars, etc. can serve as buddies for Jack Dempsey cichlids

 

Celestial Pearl Danio:

The Celestial Pearl Danio or the Rasbora galaxy is a small, peace-loving, freshwater fish. The Scientific name of Celestial Pearl Danio is Danio margaritatus. Microrasbora and Galaxy Rasbora are the other common names of Celestial Pearl Danio and are found in the waters of Myanmar famous by the name Myanmar Cyprinid.

Features:

The fish has soothing colors, white spots with orange fins. Unexpectedly this is a pretty new fish species. The lifespan of the Celestial Pearl Danio in stable aquariums is usually 3-5 years. Due to the small size of Celestial Pearl Danios, they can help jazz up any aquarium that is planted.

Care:

Keep the pH neutral and temperature about 75°F in the water tank for these fishes to experience ease. These fishes can survive in hard water. Ideally, the temperature of the water tank and pH level should be about 73°-79°F and 6.5 to 7.5 dGH, respectively. It would be best if you kept them in a 10-gallon tank, despite their small size. To take care of your Celestial Pearl Danio, make sure you have an appropriate number of plants in your tank.

Food habit:

The Celestial Pearl Danio is an omnivore that will consume almost any healthy topical hobby fish food. These fishes consume several species of algae, insects, and zooplankton in their natural environment. They were also known to eat tiny invertebrates and worms. These fish are primarily opportunistic feeders, which is why their diets are so diverse.

Aquarium Tank Mates:

They’re pacifists, regardless of their quiet nature. And you have to hold the fishes that are not aggressive and of a similar size or smaller for the pleasant celestial pearl danio. Tetras, Corydoras, Guppies, and Killifish are their perfect tank-mates.

 

Peacock Cichlid:

Peacock Cichlid

Peacock cichlids are considered to be one of the most popular freshwater fishes in the aquarium world. The Peacock Cichlid is an exotic fish species that can be found near Lake Malawi. Aulonocara Nyassae is the scientific name of Peacock Cichlid. Peacock cichlid is also known as Aulonocara or usually peacocks.

Features:

They’re among the most colorful fish that you’ll find, from blue, gold, orange to yellow. The first is around the mid-section of the fish, the last being at the base of the caudal fin. The body is yellow from the cover of the gill to the stripes on the forehead. The fins are yellow except for the pectoral with the tail, having a blue marbling. A male peacock cichlid can be up to 6 inches long, whereas the females can be of a max of 4 inches long. Their life expectancy is about 8 to 10 years.

Care:

You’ll need at least a 55-gallon tank to provide proper living space to these fishes. Peacock cichlids are used to harsh alkaline water due to the high mineral content in the Lake Malawi water. Most cichlids in Lake Malawi prefer water with a pH between 7.5-9.0 and a water hardness of 18 to 25 dGH. The temperature will range from 76°-82°F.

Food Habit:

Peacock cichlids are omnivores which means they eat meat as well as plant/vegetables. They are bottom dwellers in the wild, meaning they’ll sift for food through the sandy substrates. Insects, larvae, zooplankton, and other crustaceans may usually be these.

Aquarium Tankmates:

Fortunately, though Peacock Cichlids don’t live like other Cichlids and are generally friendly in their approach, with these peacock cichlids, you may prefer to put Copadichromis, Placidochromis, Nyassachromis, and Sciaenochromis to accompany them in the aquarium.

 

Cherry Barb:

Cherry Barb Fish

These fishes are scientifically known by the name of Puntius Titteya and belong to the Cyprinidae family. These fishes come from Srilanka and are pretty cute fishes that can add some glory and charm to your fish tanks. They are also found in Panama, Mexico, and Columbia and are also known as Barbus titteya and Capoeta titteya.

Features: 

They derive their name as Cherry barbs owing to the cherry red color that they exhibit from head to toe. They are long and thin fishes with a size that can go up to 2 inches. They can live for about five to six years and thus are a smart inclusion for your aquariums.

Caring:

A school of fish can be kept in 25 to 30 gallons of water tank without making them feel the space crunch. The water temperature should be ideally between 73°-81°F with a pH level anywhere between 6 to 8. Also, you should take into account that the hardness of water does not exceed 19dGH with a minimum count of 5dGH.

Food habit:

These fishes are omnivorous and can eat a wide range of fish feeds and are highly flexible with their eating habits. Worms, planktons, algae, insects, you can feed these with any of these to keep them in good health. Other food rich in protein, such as shrimps and bloodworms, can also be an excellent supplement for fish food.

Aquarium mates:

Otocinclus, Kuhli Loaches, Asian Stone Cats, mollies, Pearl Gourami, Dwarf Gourami, Neon Tetras, Rainbow Sharks, etc. can serve to be good companions for cherry barbs.

 

Swordtail Fish:

Swordtails are a species of freshwater belonging to the family of Poeciliidae. They are usually found in Mexico and Honduras and are native to North and Central America. The scientific name of Swordtail is Xiphophorus helleri. The most common name used for this fish is helleri, Xiphophorus maculatus, and Xiphophorus variatus.

Features:

The lifespan of these fishes can be up to five years once they acquire space in your aquarium – they can live for a long time in the tank with appropriate water temperature, pH, hardness, environment. The first thing that you’ll spot is its caudal fin. They have elongated lobes on their tail, which looks like a spear; hence they acquire its name as swordtail. Thanks to intensive captive breeding, however, these days, you will find them in various colors, including reds, oranges, and blacks. While the males can be up to 5.5 inches long, females may be up to one inch bigger.

Care:

Plants are a significant addition as Swordtails like to hide when they feel nervous. You can consider spreading them in the vicinities of the tank, but make sure you leave plenty of room for swimming. The pH level of the water must be held at 7-8.4, whereas the water hardness should be 12-30 dGH. Temperatures will range from 70°-82°F. It is a blissful species that work well in other small peaceful fish community tanks.

Food Habit:

Swordtails can eat virtually anything; so, designing an appropriate diet is effortless. The omnivorous diet in the wild may include insect larvae, algae, and other plants. To supply them with a variety of nutrients, you should give them high-quality dried foods. Yet they need lots of protein as juveniles. It means living/frozen bloodworms, daphnia, and brine shrimp are valuable additional products to a dried food diet.

Aquarium Tank Mates:

You can find other suitable species quickly, choosing between them is the hardest part. You might blend them into the tank’s mid-levels with Mollies, Dwarf Gourami, Rosy Barbs, Neon Tetras, Angelfish or Pearl Danio.

Kuhli Loaches, Dwarf Corydoras, Zebra Loaches, and Otocinclus are good choices to add some lower-level play. Avoid aggressive species as they can attack your swordtails and cause injury.

 

Killifish:

Killifishes are beautifully patterned fish species and exist in vibrant color splashes. Cyprinodontiforms, commonly known as Killifish, are found throughout the world, except in Australia and Antarctica, in almost every continent. Fundulus heteroclitus is the scientific name for Killifish. Some common names for Killifish are Mummy, Chub, and Minnow.

Features:

Usually, Killifish are slim and have a pike-shaped structure, making them excellent swimmers. Others have a body shaped more cylindrically and short fins and some have long wide fins. The shape of their body may vary based on the species, but all of them have a set of dorsal fins near the back body. Males have wider dorsal and anal fins in comparison to the female Killifishes. They can be from 1 inch to 4.

Care:

For a standard pair of Killifish, a 20-gallon tank is fine. Suitable plants include the cryptochromes, which you can consider putting in the tank. Most Killifish require temperatures of 72°-75°F in water. Water hardness of 120-160 ppm is suitable for most Killies. In each Killifish tank, the pH balance is different because every Killie has its own requisite frame. Most Killifish are friendly, and in the group, tanks get along well, but sometimes, the males are violent against each other.

Food Habit:

Killifish are mostly carnivores, and they eat crustaceans, insect larvae, and worms in their natural habitat. Some are omnivores, and their diet includes algae. They can also be fed with live food, brine shrimp, Daphnia, and Mosquito Larvae.

Aquarium Tank Mates:

That being said, tetras such as Neon Tetras, Rummy Nose Tetras, and Cardinal Tetras are best kept with Killifish. Many other good options are Lyretail Black, Gularis Dwarf, Endlers, and Gardners. Any tranquil fish can also be accommodated with Killifish.

 

Oscar Fish:

Oscar Fish

Oscars are a cichlid species and are mostly found in Brazil, Columbia, French Guiana, Ecuador, and Peru. Astronotus ocellatus is the scientific name of Oscar Fish. There are some common names of Oscar fish like Tiger Oscar, marble Cichlid, and Velvet Cichlid.

Features:

Many varieties grow to be huge, to a maximum of 12 inches. In their lifetime, they achieve this size very fast, mounting one inch a month until they have fully matured. They have a long oval-shaped body. Lemon and Red Oscar fish have almost entirely solid yellow or red bodies, respectively. Its fins can be either white or black. They live approximately 18-20 years if kept in good condition.

Care:

You can keep one or two Oscars in a large 125-gallon aquarium. They need water temperature ranging between 72°-81°F. The pH should be regulated between 7.2 to 8, and the alkalinity level should be between 8 and 15 dGH. They are not afraid of attacking, especially if a fish invades their territory. The matting and feeding times can enhance their aggression as well.

Food Habit:

They are omnivores and can eat almost everything you give them. Oscars usually eat insects, smaller fish, worms, seeds, berries, and fruit in their environment. Live or frozen foods are other options. These involve bloodworms, daphnia, and shrimp brine.

Aquarium Tank Mates:

This species isn’t the best to make friends with. Their violent nature can lead aquarium mates to fear-filled living. A few beautiful fishes that can be included in the tank are Arowanas, Bichirs, Green Terrors, Convict Cichlids, Firemouth Cichlids, Jack Dempseys, Jaguar Cichlids, Sailfin Plecos, etc.

 

Green Terror Cichlid:

 

Green terror cichlids are known as Aequidens rivulatus in scientific terms and are also known as White Saums and Gold saums. They were originally found in the tropical rivers of Ecuador and Peru in the country of South America.

Features: 

As the name suggests, these cichlids are green in color, and they have blue or green colored scales on their sides. You can also get to see bright orange-colored stripes on the tail and dorsal fins of male Green Terror Cichlid. They have an average lifespan of about seven to ten years. They can grow up as adults to take over a size between 6 to 12 inches.

Caring:

These fishes can survive in a water tank that consists of 55 gallons of water and temperature varying between 76°-80°F. The apt hardness of tank water is 3 to 6dGH and should have a pH scale between 6 and 7.5.

Food habit:

These fishes are carnivores and can be fed with small insects and crustaceans. You can also consider feeding them with worms, pellets, and frozen or live food.

Aquarium mates:

Gars, Large Loricariids, Pacus, and silver dollars can serve to be the perfect tank mates for these Green Terror Cichlids. Make sure that you keep these cichlids with fishes of the same temperament and size.

 

Zebra danio:

Zebra Danios are supposed to be found in South Asian countries like Bhutan, Myanmar, India, and Bangladesh. They belong to the Cyprinidae family and are also commonly known as Zebrafish and Striped Danios. Their scientific name is Danio rerio and is a famous breed for community aquariums.

Features: 

Zebra danios are social fish breeds and are peaceful and calm in their attributes. They have five blue stripes over their silver and golden colored body that runs down the length of their body from their head to caudal fins. These schooling fishes usually grow about 2 inches and can live for five years at the maximum.

Caring:

To meet the requisites of your zebra Danios, you need to ensure that these fishes are kept in an aquarium that can hold a minimum of 5 gallons of water with the temperature set up between 64°-77°F. The ideal pH range should be between 6 to 8 as these fishes can survive amongst soft and medium-hard water.

Food habit:

You can have some peace of mind as these breeds are not fussy eaters and thus can be fed with anything of your wish. Worms, insects, algae, crustaceans can form a staple food diet for these breeds.

Aquarium mates:

Zebra danios love to take place in community tanks and thus can be kept amidst Gouramis, Swordtails, Yoyo Loaches, Corydoras, Redtail Sharks, and a few more other fishes.

 

Conclusion:

For all enthusiasts who take up fish keeping as a hobby, we hope that this guide must have surely been helpful for you to get a brief idea of the inhabitants of the underwater world. So which fish do you think is best for you? Do let us know!

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